Slow down and enjoy the dough…

Sourdough post featured image2

As I am sure most bloggers do, every week I spend a large proportion of my spare time browsing social media and visiting others people’s blogs. I have learnt over the last six months that the blogging community is a friendly and welcoming place and have found that this browsing habit brings with it both inspiration and affirmation in equal measure.

One such affirmation this week has been the overwhelming need to slow down and enjoy life. In a recent post the lovely Lucy Heath at Capture by Lucy reflected on the idea of ‘slow living’ and a new pace of life which has offered moments of calmness in a busy schedule and lots of extra happiness. Alongside this some random Facebook browsing unearthed a HuffPost article by Rachel Macy Stafford entitled ‘The Day I Stopped Saying ‘Hurry Up’. This retold the moment the author was inspired by her thoughtful, observant child to slow down so that she could enjoy life more.   These pieces mirrored a feeling that has also developed in me over the last few years, where life events have taught me that I need to slow down, live life more positively and appreciate the everyday moments which bring me happiness.

After a busy couple of weeks and the feeling I might be coming down with a cold, a few days living life in the slow lane were exactly what was needed this weekend and so some sourdough bread making was on the cards.  Baking sourdough is most definitely a bread experience which requires patience but is certainly worth the wait, as the loaf produced has a flavour of its very own which, with every bite, makes you feel like you are eating the ‘real’ thing and makes you realise the lack of any flavour found in commercially produced loaves.

IMG_20160123_220251

How inviting does this loaf look?

My love affair with this distinctively flavoured delight came about as a result of Mr B’s weekend routine of rushing to our local supermarket to get one of their few loaves and often returning disappointed.  I therefore decided that for his last birthday I would give him a sourdough starter (purchased from Hobbs House Bakery online). This to most would probably seem like a fairly odd gift to give to their husbands but not for Mr B, he was delighted to receive it and couldn’t wait for the first loaf to be produced. It has been almost a year since then and during this time I have made a loaf most months and through this routine have learnt a lot about this artisan form of bread making.

Sourdough ingredients

 

The magic of a sourdough loaf is that it is produced with only four simple ingredients – a starter, flour, water and salt.  It is the starter which is the star ingredient, the simple addition of warmth to a flour and water mixture encourages the production of natural yeasts (which give the loaf its rise) and bacteria (which give the loaf its distinctive flavour).  The dough rises slowly when using a starter as opposed to the ‘fast acting’ dried yeast used in most loaves, however it is worth the wait.  In total the production of a loaf, from feeding the starter to taking the first bite of a freshly baked loaf, is around 24 hours.  This may sound like an arduous amount of time, however the involvement of the baker in this time period is less than an hour as their only task is to produce the dough. Prior to this the starter has been fed with some additional flour and water to reinvigorate it after its incubation in the fridge (where it lives between loaves) and then it rises slowly for up to twelve hours before being baked.

Tweaking the recipe

 

 

It has been my mission over the last year to produce a perfect loaf and finally this weekend I think I may have finally achieved this (or certainly got the closest I ever have). Over the months I have been making sourdough bread I have tweaked the original recipe and adapted the technique through trial and error (as well as some well-founded research).  This seems to have all paid off as the loaf which emerged from the oven on Saturday evening could only be described as ‘stupendous’, a golden delight whose crust was a crispy coat surrounding the precious flavoursome loaf inside. Spread with butter whilst still slightly warm it was heaven on a plate and soon between Mr B and I almost half the loaf had disappeared.

Steps to success with sourdough

I’d recommend to anyone who has not tasted sourdough to give it a try, at first it’s tangy flavour is a little overwhelming but once the taste buds have adjusted it is such a delightful loaf which leaves others in its wake.  If you’re interested in attempting to bake your own, I’d definitely encourage you and to give you a helping hand I would love to share with you what I have learnt in my journey to a perfect loaf.

Sarah’s sourdough tips

  • Starter – although it is fairly simple and very economical to produce your own sourdough starter (see instructions here), I chose to buy an established starter from a baker. My reasons for this were that it would be more active and resilient, guaranteeing a reliable and flavoursome loaf from the outset.
  • Balancing the flour and starter ratios – I have tweaked the ratio between these two ingredients in order to create a loaf with the amount of tanginess which both Mr B and I enjoy. For the scientists in you this can also be influenced by the temperature at which the starter is fed as well as the liquid/flour balance of the original starter so I’d encourage you to give these a little tweak too and see what happens.
  • Time the loaf is left to rise – my recipe states that the dough should be left to rise for twelve hours, however after several loaves and a little research I soon realised this was too long as it was over-proving and each time the loaf came out of the oven a large gap would be present between the crust and the inner crumb at the top. I have since left the loaves for around eight hours or until they have approximately doubled in size. The length of this time can vary depending on the temperature in the room but please don’t be tempted to put it in the airing cupboard as the slow rise is also key in developing the distinctive flavour.
  • Using a proving basket and baking stone – the benefits of using these two items is that the loaves have a wonderful shape which they take on in the proving stage whilst sitting in the basket and a wonderful crisp golden crust which comes from the brick oven type effect the heated stone gives.
  • Temperature change in the oven – a recent discovery has been the need to reduce the temperature by 20-30C after the first ten minutes of baking. This emulates the effect of a brick oven which naturally drops in temperature during the baking time and produces the distinctive crisp crust without ending up with a over-baked loaf (as the initial temperature is usually the highest your oven will go).
  • Steam in the oven – another secret to producing a great crust is the addition of steam at the beginning of the baking time – I achieve this by adding some boiling water to a roasting tin in the bottom of the oven just before I put the unbaked loaf on the baking stone.

Good luck with your sourdough adventures, I’d love to hear about your successes and any tips you have for creating your perfect loaf as I am sure there is still more for me to learn.

Happy baking!!

Creating textile art with Katie Essam

I am so excited to share with you today an amazing day I had last Friday in the company of the very talented Katie Essam and my lovely friend Lucy Bishop (of Mrs Bishops Bakes and Banter blog).

As most of you are aware I love to learn and am always seeking ways to improve my craft skills, so when Lucy and I met the lovely textile artist Katie Essam, at the Handmade Fair last September, I was super excited to hear that she ran workshops and jumped at the chance to go on one.

Her work is amazing, combining a multitude of materials including paint, wool and paper as well as the more conventional fabric that is usually seen in free motion work. I just knew a workshop with Katie would be an wonderful experience and a great learning opportunity.

Details/Close ups

An example of Katie’s wonderful work – a bespoke boot family (photo by Katie Essam)

Luckily for Lucy and I, Katie is based just up the road from us, in Watford, so on Friday morning we headed the short distance up the M1 excited for what lay ahead.  Upon arrival the super friendly Katie welcomed us into her lovely home and we quickly settled in her studio to practice some sketching with the machine.

The freedom that lowering the feed dogs and attaching an embroidery foot offers is so satisfying, it turns the needle into a drawing implement allowing a line to be drawn in whichever direction you fancy (a rather disconcerting experience at first but awesome once you get the hang of it).   Having done some free motion work previously I took this opportunity to practice creating a blackwork style picture , using an adult colouring card as inspiration for this.

 

blackwork

 A scribble, a doodle and an attempt at a fox – practise makes perfect

We soon moved onto making decisions about our final piece, which we would be working on for the rest of the day.  I  decided to focus on animals as my inspiration as I was keen to include some of the needle felting that I had seen in Katie’s work and she had recommended something furry if that was the case.   During the week I had spent a couple of evenings sketching British wildlife and on the day, with Katie’s expert opinion to help me, I settled on a pair of leaping hares as the focus for my final piece.

Now the fun really began as we were let in on the secrets behind Katie’s amazing work and encouraged to apply them to our own pieces.  What a great time both Lucy and I had playing with fabric and transforming our designs into wonderful pieces of art. Katie was such an amazing teacher, she had prepared examples of her techniques for us to refer to as well as a handout to take home (in both a written and visual format – thank goodness as I am such a visual learner with this sort of thing!).  She was also really patient and encouraging throughout the day as well as being a generally lovely person and a mean jacket potato chef (which we had for lunch to fuel our activities).

sketchingcollage

My sketches,  inspired by the wildlife of Great Britain

 

I loved having the opportunity to learn from such a talented artist and although I had been on a free motion course previously I gained a host of new skills from Katie as well as being offered some handy tips to help me improve my overall sewing skills when creating pieces at home.   It was also lovely to see my super crafty friend Lucy learning a new skill whilst creating a beautiful and unsurprisingly biscuit/cake themed piece.

IMG_20160115_120020IMG_20160115_142108IMG_20160115_152352

Sneaky peaks of the process – from template to stitched pieces (back view) 

We both ended the day hand finishing our pieces in our own individual style, with my hares getting fluffy tummies, tails and hind quarters using some wool fibers and a few stitches as well as a touch of pink paint in their ears.  These final touches, accompanied by the techniques Katie had taught us, really brought the pieces to life and I know both Lucy and I were both super proud of our completed work and can’t thank Katie enough for sharing her knowledge and skills with us.

The amazing effect of paint and fibres to bring a piece to life (photos by Katie Essam) 

Close ups of my completed piece – love how much detail I was able to achieve

IMG_20160116_102019IMG_8963

So proud of my pair of leaping hares – can’t wait to frame them

(second image by Katie Essam)

I definitely urge anyone who wants to learn free motion embroidery to book onto a course with Katie (even if you are less local than we were – it’s worth travelling for). Her workshops are tailor-made to your level of skill and she is such a lovely person who throughout the day is on hand for help, encouragement and inspiration. If you want to know more visit her website here.

I can’t wait to start my next free motion piece at home, the day has taught me so much and is really going to have a massive impact on the quality of my work going forward. Keep your eyes peeled on my social media platforms over the next month or so as I will be sharing my progress as I create my first collection of pieces to sell – so exciting!!

A button bonanza…

I’m not really the type of person to make new year resolutions as I think that anytime is a good time to make a change in your life for the better. However, I do view the new year as an exciting time of anticipation, wondering what the year ahead will hold and if my ongoing dreams and ambitions will be fulfilled.

This new year I am excited at the prospect of making my hobby into something more (and in turn hopefully fulfilling a long held ambition) as I look forward to creating some freehand machine embroidery pieces and offering a few for sale in a lovely local bookshop. I can’t wait to take this first step in creating a little business for myself and am so excited to be collaborating with another local businesswoman (can’t wait to tell you more in an upcoming post).

For me this new year is a perfect time for this journey to begin as in the few weeks prior to the Christmas festivities I was in a stitching frenzy, creating some super secret gifts for my family and friends. Sadly, due to the top secret nature of these items a blogging drought was imposed upon me and the only indication that I had not disappeared entirely was a few sneak peaks of some of the makes on Instagram.

The inspiration for all of my Christmas gift makes was a lovely collection of buttons that I picked up when I visited the Handmade Fair back in September.  Each of these was intended to represent an interest or hobby of the recipient or to reflect their style and home life.  They included a pair of miniature scissors for a fellow crafter friend, a collection of cat buttons for the feline fans in my life and a little hedgehog for my green-fingered father.

IMG_20150920_105055

I always find that my creative juices flow better when I have a great starting point and these buttons were a perfect example of this being the case with each one inspiring a collection of designs.  This paired with my wonderful fabric collection, which also happily grew in the run up to Christmas due to a very bountiful fabric swap, meant that I was super excited to start making the designs into a reality.

In a mad couple of weeks before Christmas every night and weekend was spent finalising designs, creating templates and choosing fabrics as well as the wonderful creation of the seven pieces destined for a place under my friends and families Christmas trees. I worked as usual to the wire (under pressure is always better isn’t it!?) finishing the final piece on the 23rd of December just before the madness of Christmas was due to begin.

As well as creating a collection of pieces for the most important people in my life this intense period of creativity, across a diverse range of designs, really helped to build my skills in freehand machine embroidery which I think will be super helpful going forward.  I feel like I am on a crafting journey every time I sit down to craft  and am so excited about what the next few months will bring and the things I will learn.

I’d like to finish with a picture of my sister receiving her gift, which was a representation of her adorable cats who my whole family have fallen in love with (including myself – Mrs Cat Allergy Central!). I think these pictures do not need any further explanation, they speak for themselves and are the reason I love making and creating.

London Calling…

London Calling title

With the kids back at school and the end of the holidays seemingly a distant memory (even though it was only a few short days ago) this week has had a strange feeling about it. Social media has been full of smiley faces in new school uniforms and shiny shoes as opposed to the busyness of holiday time where the smiles reflect the adventures being had at home and away.

The nervousness of a new term is something I am fully aware of as a primary school teacher. At some level all involved are nervous; the teacher who worries about settling their little charges in and making them feel secure and happy so that the exciting learning journey can being with gusto; the children whose natural sponge capacity and inquisitive nature can disappear into the background a little while they get used to their new surroundings, new routines and the new expectations put on them as they grow older; and last but by no means least the parents, nervous as they let their little ones hands go and send them into school to be someone else’s daily companion.

Backtoschool

Smiles on the first day back from my gorgeous niece and nephew x

The end of the summer for my sister in law and her two little ones has brought more nervousness than usual with worries about the new term being overshadowed by the impending surgery their mummy is about to undergo the following week.   After suffering for all of her adult life with the debilitating disease endometriosis she has made the difficult decision to undergo surgery to remove her womb and enjoy a future where she can be happy and pain free everyday with her ‘miracle’ children, who she never expected to be able to have.

For my gorgeous niece and nephew who have had a wonderful holiday with their mummy this nervousness is no surprise. Parents like teachers are in their eyes invincible, people who don’t get ill or need looking after by others.  I can relate to this feeling, as a child I remember feeling scared and worried every time my Mum had a migraine and had to lie down in a dark room without any disturbances, until it passed.  It was with the knowledge that these feeling would arise that my sister in law approached me during the summer break and commissioned me to create a free motion textile piece for her to share with her little ones before she goes in for her surgery.

Summerfuncollage

Seven weeks of smiles and adventures…

The theme of this piece was to be London and reflect some of their favourite places to visit particularly along Embankment. After a few quick sketches, a basic design was decided upon with the key features being the iconic and familiar London landmarks of the Eye, the Gherkin and the Houses of Parliament.  I was excited to begin this project, not only because the reason for its commission has so much meaning but also because the subject also reflects a part of London that is close to my heart and always at the top of the list when we head into the big smoke.

The real work for this piece began with turning my scrappy little sketch into a more defined and detailed drawing. As with my seaside inspired pieces from earlier in the summer, the finished piece would be a cushion and so this determined the size it.   It is at this stage that I really got a feeling for the design as I created a to-scale image from which I then made templates for the final textile piece.

LCdesign

From scrappy initial sketch to detailed design

My excitement grew as I surrounded myself with my many fat quarter bundles and ever growing collection of fabric scraps from various projects. I am very much of the mind set of waste not, want not, keeping almost every last piece of fabric however small with the determination that one day they will be needed for a project.   Whilst happily sitting in this sewing squalor (thank goodness Mr B was at work and didn’t witness the creative chaos) I set about choosing fabrics for the individual features of the design. I had been trusted with choosing this aspect of the design without any further consultation and I had decided upon a mainly funky modern feel for the iconic buildings with a more muted tones for the river itself.  After a thorough rummage through my fabric collection I had found a good selection of materials which fitted this bill and was ready to begin the best part.

Sitting at my sewing machine ready to begin is probably the post nerve wracking part of the whole process as it is the moment when you are committing to the design and your fabric choices and there is no turning back. For me, as well, with only a few projects under my belt and with my skills still developing, the nerves are ever present as I hope that it will turn out how my imagination intended it to. The process of free motion embroidery also means that unpicking any mistakes is costly and time consuming which it is best to avoid.

As the piece progressed it organically took its own path, even as a self-confessed perfectionist and planner, I enjoy the fact that sometimes ideas develop whilst working on a project and this was certainly the case with this one.  After completing the Eye and Gherkin I began work on the Houses of Parliament. Apart from the grey fabric, I had not decided anything else about this part, but once the other two landmarks had been completed finishing Big Ben and detailing the buildings with blue and pink thread and fabric seemed like the obvious and only choice.

PicsArt_09-11-11.35.27[1]

Finally it was time to complete the river aspect of the design and although to an idle passer-by these features are just incidental in comparison to the main attractions already completed, these are some of the parts I am the proudest of.  I wanted even these features to be recognisable and had studied images of the railings and walls along the river and tried to include these in my design.  I probably spent almost as long completing the railings at the bottom as I did on both the Gherkin and the Eye put together. Each railing was completed individually, cutting the thread after each one!! Whilst being consumed in this repetitive process my reel of thread ran empty, thankfully I had some to replace it (a small miracle as I do not have many thread colours at present!).  The lamps on either bank followed and last but by no means least it was time to create the stick people.  Although stick people are probably one of the easiest things to draw, using a sewing machine to draw one is not quite so easy so it was with trepidation that I approached this task.  I initially only intended to have a family group on the top pathway but after practising on some scrap material and to my surprise finding that I was able to reproduce my little people I decided to create a busy riverside scene more reminiscent of the real thing, with wooden benches, a bicyclist and a mother pushing a pram along the bottom pathway. To be honest this is probably the part I am most proud of as it really brought it to life and added that little something I didn’t know it needed until I reached the end.

PicsArt_09-10-11.58.19

PicsArt_09-11-11.46.57[1]

Probably my favourite part of the piece x

Having reached the end of the free motion embroidery work, creating the cushion cover itself happened in a flash and the piece was complete, with a complementary London themed fabric from My Fabric House used as the back cover, a lucky find which really finished it off nicely.  Completing this piece has probably been some of the most satisfying sewing I have done to date, I love the process of designing a one of a kind piece and am learning to allow a piece to grow as it is being created. I have to admit I am sad to see it go but am happy to think that its recipients will get as much joy from it being theirs as I have from creating it. The fact that it will help to ease a difficult time in their lives and be a lasting reminder of their one of their favourite places, I couldn’t be happier to send it to its forever home.

PicsArt_09-11-11.50.55

Finished and ready for its forever home xx

Brilliant blog posts on HonestMum.com

If at first you don’t succeed…

This week’s crafting has been mainly about taking note of the old adage described in the title of this post as I have been busy designing and making a range of mini-totes.

The story of these mini-totes starts with a slight obsession I have developed recently with fat quarter bundles. There is something so appealing about a set of complimentary fabrics bundled together ready to be made into whatever takes your fancy. These bundles can be bought quite cheaply from most places you’d normally get fabric and provide a perfect excuse for creating mini-makes (my favourite kind of make of all).

Fat quarter bundles

A selection of my fat quarter bundles

Whilst perusing my selection of fat quarter bundles one evening I had the idea to make a mini-tote based on the one I originally made when I learnt to sew. Having never adapted a pattern before I decided to dive straight in and resize the measurements so that they would fit a fat quarter piece of fabric. This took a bit of jiggery-pokery with the calculations (not my strong point) but eventually I came up with some measurements which would create a pattern which was about two-thirds the size of the original.

Adapting pattern

The original tote and pattern – with my added scribbles!

Feeling chuffed with myself for my lucky maths, I set about making the prototype mini-tote from some cute cat print  and a contrasting green interior fabric. The thing I really like about this pattern is that it is has a wide base so that it can sit flat and not fall over when it has items inside and the fact that it is lined which gives it durability as well making it visually appealing with the contrasting interior.

Adapting the pattern, cutting and sewing the fabric took me well into the early hours, however, it was worth staying up late as the prototype turned out surprisingly well. The only change which I decided I would make for mini-tote number two would be to widen the straps so their proportions matched the original version better.

Prototype tote

The prototype mini-tote

A perfect tester for my prototype was found in the form of my four year old niece who over the weekend ran it through it’s paces by filling it with all manner of girly items and taking it out and about with her.

Whilst discussing this first make with my sister in law I decided that as well as widening the straps I would add an internal pocket to fit small items into. The original pattern for the larger tote included an external pocket, however, due to the restrictions of trying to fit the pattern onto a fat quarter sized piece of fabric this was not possible on the scaled down version so, for this reason as well, an internal pocket also seemed a good idea for the mini version.

Prototype bag

Plenty of room for lots of girly bits x

The next day’s sewing involved designing and creating an internal pocket and adding this to mini-tote bag number two. By a happy accident, I was also able to create a small purse from a wrongly sized first attempt at a pocket (I forgot to add a seam allowance). The purse is definitely a work in progress and may be the next project I work on.

Steps to success

Creating mini-tote number two

mini tote 2 and purse

Completed mini-tote two and its matching purse

I have since gone on to make two more mini-totes from the same fat quarter bundle (and intend to make one more this weekend) as well as another purse, plus a pink and black version using some fabric from another fat quarter bundle.

Purse 2

A more grown up version of the mini-tote and matching purse

Mini totes

Which is your favourite mini-tote? 

I have really enjoyed making these mini-totes and feel proud of myself for managing to overcome some difficulties I faced and for successfully adapting a pattern (thanks goes to Janet at KitchenTableSewing for the original). My mini-tester certainly enjoyed using the prototype and has since become the recipient of the new improved version with internal pocket and matching purse, much to her delight.

A look back on my crafty year…

As a teacher, I have two beginnings each year, one in January and one in September. These mark two new fresh starts for me and although I am not a person who particularly believes in making new year’s resolutions, on occasions these times in the year do encourage a flurry of action in me, particularly if I have an ambition in mind.   The last time this happened to me was back in the new year of 2010 when I signed up to the dating site OKCupid and by January 2011 I had met and moved in with Mr B, my lovely husband.

IMAGE-864 IMAGE-219

Unsurprisingly a handmade knitted version made an appearance on the big day!

It was in September last year, in another flurry of action, I decided this was the year to start on a new journey and expand my crafting skills in new directions. Since then I have embarked on a busy year of learning and have met some really lovely people along the way.

Learning to sew was my first foray, although I had tinkered with my Mum’s sewing machine whilst making superhero masks and capes for my husband’s stag do, I really wanted to feel more confident and able to create more professionally finished items.  After a short search via Facebook, I enrolled on a beginners sewing course with the lovely Janet over at KitchenTableSewing who, over the course of four evenings and fueled by cups of tea and wonderful homemade cakes, helped me to master the basics of using a sewing machine and produce some wonderful first makesDSC_0205 DSC_0208 DSC_0212 DSC_0223

Can you guess which superheroes they represent??

As usual once the I had been bitten by the bug it was hard for me to stop so inspired by my success on the beginners course I proceeded to create at least 75% of my Christmas presents for friends and family using the sewing machine and learnt a couple of new patterns and processes in the progress.

DSC_0047

My Christmas sewing bounty!

I have since returned to the kitchen table for more cakey yumminess and, of course, sewing guidance from Janet, attending two more of her courses, making my very own Coco from the Tilly and the Buttons pattern and a pair of fancy knickers using some fantastic Liberty print fabric. I was also inspired enough to buy my own machine, a super duper Janome DSK100, which has made my sewing experience so lovely and saved a lot of time with its numerous nifty time saving gadgets.

IMG_20150626_222642 IMG_20150802_193742

Some very fancy pants sewn on my super duper machine x

As the New Year approached I decided that my next skill to master would be needle-felting. This was a skill I felt I could teach myself (perhaps with a little help from the internet) and so bought myself a kit to make a felted hedgehog from Hobbycraft.  Although little Wimpole, as my nephew and niece soon Christened him, was a bit rough around the edges I was pretty proud of my first attempt at this new skill.

DSC_0115

Meet Wimpole the Hedgehog

Next I tackled what had become, as a seasoned knitter at least, my nemesis – crochet!  It has always appealed to me but when I have attempted it previously I have found that my knitting technique has worked against me. Professional help was definitely needed. So on a wet Wednesday evening in March I travelled to Hitchin to a recent yarn discovery, the fantastic Knit Knacks shop, and settled in for an evening of wool and hooks.

In the company of three other crochet novices and with the assistance of resident expert Helen Ingram who runs Woolly Chic, a fantastic website selling hand sourced British wool and crochet/knitting kits, I finally got through my hook block and managed to produce a lovely crochet flower by the end of the evening. In these few hours my wool nemesis had become an ally to its much loved knitted friend.

DSC_0342

Floral crochetness x

The final destination on my crafting journey involved travelling the longest distance yet as I signed up for a workshop at Needle and Thread (near Lincoln) to learn how to create textile art using applique and free motion embroidery with the very talented Cathy Emmott of Dear Emma Designs.

I have always admired this kind of needle work and had been searching for a workshop to attend for a long time so was so pleased when I came across this gem.  Over a busy six hours Cathy inspired and assisted a lovely group of twelve crafty enthusiasts to become novice needle and thread artists. This was a fantastic conclusion to my crafty year and definitely worth the four hour round journey!

needle and thread 3

Cathy’s inspirational needlework x

Needle and thread 1

The novice needle and thread artists proudly present their work x

needle and thread 2

My design in progress

The last twelve months have certainly been busy and I have really enjoyed learning new crafting skills. I wonder what the next twelve months will hold for me.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin